Meeting – November 16th 2017

Meetings of the Society
Auckland Medical History Society

The Auckland Medical History Society will meet in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library at Auckland City Hospital on Thursday 16th November 2017 

 

 

The evening will be as follows:

  • 6.00pm: Drinks will be served in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library
  • 6.30pm: Buffet Christmas Dinner will be served in the dining room
  • 7.30pm: Guest presentation*
                                                      PRESENTATION

The Gates of Hell: Dante, Rodin and Charcot                                        presented by Dr Mark Fisher

(We are grateful to Dr Mark Fisher for agreeing to replace our scheduled speaker, Rob Harley, who is unwell).

DINNER PRICES

  • Members: $45
  • Non-members and guests: $55
  • Students with ID: $18
  • Glass of wine: $5
  • Bottle of wine: $20
  • Table water and juice are complimentary.

Please pay for your dinner and wine vouchers in advance, and collect the vouchers with your name badge on the night of the dinner.

BOOKING INFO

  • Book by email: Send the names of attendees to aucklandmhs@gmail.com with confirmation that you have made payment to the AMHS account: 02 0160 0237509 00.
  • Book by phone: Call 0274 305 326 with the names of attendees, method of payment and your phone number.
  • Book by mail: Post your cheque (payable to the Auckland Medical History Society) along with the names of attendees and your phone number, to:

Elizabeth Collins, PO Box 133190, Eastridge, Auckland 1146

  • Final booking time, and cancellations: Please provide your booking details by midday on Mon 13 Nov   Cancellations with refund or credit of any payment made will be accepted by phone or email as above until noon on Weds 15 Nov.  Please pay in advance of the evening so that we can pay our caterers before the event.

*Payment is not required if you are attending the presentations only.

Presenter, Dr Mark Fisher 

Mark was born in Auckland and attended the Auckland Medical school. After his first year as a House Officer he undertook further studies for 18 months including art history and psychology. He then joined the psychiatry training programme in Auckland and on graduation worked across North Shore and Auckland hospitals. Mark specialised in both the Psychiatry of Old Age and Liaison Psychiatry, but has mainly practiced in the former. He has worked in the UK, Tauranga, and for the last 10 years at Counties Manukau DHB, where he is the Clinical Head of Old Age Psychiatry. Mark’s interests are in medico-legal issues, driving with dementia, ECT and dementia services. He is currently the DAMHS at CMDHB, which is a Mental Health Act-related responsibility

Topic Summary – The Gates of Hell: Dante, Rodin and Charcot

This talk is based on a journal article written by Natasha Ruiz-Gomez. Rodin’s masterwork “the Gates of Hell” was based on Dante’s The Divine Comedy. It includes within it Rodin’s most widely-known work, “The Thinker”, which is familiar to most people (see picture below, just under the portal.) The gates of Hell contains within it images from a number of the stories from the Divine Comedy, and is supposed to represent one of the gates into Hell that Dante described. Natasha Ruiz-Gomez asserts that Rodin used patients from the Salpetriere Hospital as images or models for many of the figures in his sculpture. Charcot, who was the famous neurologist and head of the Salpetriere Hospital in Paris, had a great interest in Hysteria, and she claims it is the photos and pictures of these patients that Rodin used as his models. Also, Rodin attended displays of Hysteria, that Charcot would put on at the hospital for friends, colleagues and the public. This talk is an introduction to the work of Dante and Rodin and the issue of whether Hysteria (as per Charcot) has been reimagined in Rodin’s masterwork, The Gates of Hell.

 

Meeting – October 5th 2017

Meetings of the Society
Auckland Medical History Society

The Auckland Medical History Society will meet in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library at Auckland City Hospital on Thursday 5th October 2017 

 

 

The evening will be as follows:

  • 6.00pm: Drinks will be served in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library
  • 6.30pm: Buffet Dinner will be served in the dining room
  • 7.30pm: Annual General Meeting
  • 7.50pm: Guest presentations*
                                                      PRESENTATIONS
  1. Marie Stopes and the Sexual Revolution: Lucky Strike, Or Modern Marketing?

Presented by Eloise Sims.

  1. Dialysis in Auckland:  Addressing the Challenges from the Early years until Today.

Presented by John Francis Collins

DINNER PRICES

  • Members: $32
  • Non-members and guests: $40
  • Students with ID: $18
  • Glass of wine: $5
  • Bottle of wine: $20
  • Table water and juice are complimentary.

Please pay for your dinner and wine vouchers in advance, and collect the vouchers with your name badge on the night of the dinner.

BOOKING INFO

  • Book by email: Send the names of attendees to aucklandmhs@gmail.com with confirmation that you have made payment to the AMHS account:02 0160 0237509 00.
  • Book by phone: Call 0274 305 326 with the names of attendees, method of payment and your phone number.
  • Book by mail: Post your cheque (made out to the Auckland Medical History Society) along with the names of attendees and your phone number, to:

Elizabeth Collins, PO Box 133190, Eastridge, Auckland 1146

  • Final booking time, and cancellations: Please provide your booking details by midday on Mon 2 Oct   Cancellations with refund or credit of any payment made will be accepted by phone or email as above until noon on Weds 4 Oct.  Please pay in advance of the evening so that we can pay our caterers before the event.

*Payment is not required if you are attending the presentations only.

Presenter, Eloise Sims

Eloise Sims is a third-year history and politics undergraduate at the University of Auckland. She specialises in the foreign policies and histories of both the United States and China, and has ambitions to work for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade when she graduates. However, she is also very interested in what the history of medicine can teach us about societies past and present. In her spare time, she works as the News Editor of Craccum Magazine (the magazine of the University of Auckland), and tutors history to high-school students.

Topic Summary – Marie Stopes and the Sexual Revolution: Lucky Strike, Or Modern Marketing?

In trying to explain the overnight success of Marie Stopes’ birth control movement, traditional historians have usually chosen to emphasise the eugenic concerns of the 20th century British upper classes as being central to Stopes’ aristocratic popularity. In contrast, more revisionist historians have recently argued that we can explain Stopes’ success by understanding the utter lack of sexual education among the working classes – and the dire need for birth control devices among poverty-ridden families with seven or eight children. However, both of these rather simplistic explanations forget the most crucial element of Stopes’ success – Stopes herself. Stopes’ clever marketing and self-promotion will be explored throughout this talk, in the hope of illustrating her struggle to make birth control techniques socially acceptable in a post-WWI Britain.

Presenter, John Francis Collins

John grew up in Wellington and after attending St.Patricks College, he spent a year at Victoria University doing Medical Intermediate. He then moved to Dunedin and graduated MBChB Otago in 1974, returning to Wellington as a 6th year student where he stayed for his House Officer and Medical/Renal Registrar years. John and Jenny married in 1976 and they have 4 children and 7 grand-children. Their eldest son, Michael, works alongside John as a Renal Physician at Auckland Hospital.

After Wellington, John undertook a Clinical Research Renal Fellowship at USC-Los Angeles County Medical Centre, from 1981-1984. He has been a Renal Physician at Auckland Hospital since 1984, and Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Auckland. He has published Clinical Research in Chronic Kidney Disease and Dialysis, and is the former Clinical Director of Auckland Renal Services, Chair of the National Renal Group, and NZ councillor of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology.

John’s current interests are in Chronic Kidney Disease management, kidney stone management, and he is co-chair of Australia/NZ guidelines group developing guidelines for Indigenous people with kidney disease.

 Topic Summary – Dialysis in Auckland:  Addressing the Challenges from the Early years until Today. 

From small beginnings breaking through multiple technical challenges, dialysis has become an established part of the care of people with end stage kidney disease. Auckland was at the forefront in early developments and has often led the way for other centres. In earlier years there were age limits of 15-45 for people beginning dialysis and it was anticipated that this would be a bridge to transplantation. As technologies improved virtually anybody could be dialysed successfully but many were ineligible for transplantation. The financial cost of dialysis treatment has always been substantial ranging from $30,000-$70,000/patient per year. Inevitably this has led to intense social and health funding pressure , political and legal ramifications.  This talk will trace some of the major developments in dialysis over the last 55 years.

 

———————————————————-

 

History Book Reprint – copies are now available

 

“In the beginning” is a 430 page book that has just been reprinted.  It tells the story of how Medicine at Auckland Hospital moved from being a practice based service organization to one with a strong academic presence. The book co-authored by David Richmond, Tom Miller and Judy Murphy details events and personalities over the 40 year period between the 1960s and 2000.

 

Copies will be available at the upcoming AMHS meeting at the special price of $20. If you would like a copy, please email Tom Miller at t.miller@auckland.ac.nz or call on 849 2373 and he will bring your copy to the meeting.

 

Meeting – September 7th 2017

Meetings of the Society
Auckland Medical History Society

The Auckland Medical History Society will meet in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library at Auckland City Hospital on Thursday 7th September 2017 

 

 

The evening will be as follows:

6.00pm: Drinks will be served in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library
6.30pm: Dinner will be served in the dining room
7.30pm: Guest presenter, Ernest Willoughby
8.30pm: Guest presenter, Martin Wallace

1. Bad Karma or Devine Retribution? H L Mencken’s Stroke – Presented by Ernest Willoughby
2. Pneumonic Plague in Manchuria in 1910 – Presented by Martin Wallace

DINNER BOOKINGS
Dinner Cost: members $32 (including table waters and juice), non-members or guests $40, students with ID $18.
No payment is required for attendance at lectures only. Wine vouchers are to be pre-purchased.

Members are to:

Indicate the number of vouchers required and include payment for them with your dinner payment. One voucher will cost $5 and will be redeemed for one glass of wine. A bottle (approx. five glasses) can be purchased for $20 (4 vouchers).
 Collect your pre-ordered wine vouchers with your name badge. There will be few vouchers available on the
night so your advanced purchase of them is recommended.

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION – Number attending, names and method of payment.
 Book by phone: Call 0274 305 326 with the names of attendees, method of payment and your phone number
 Book by mail: Post the names of attendees, your phone number and cheque made out to the Auckland Medical History Society Elizabeth Collins, P O Box 133190, Eastridge, Auckland 1146
 Book by email: Send the names of attendees to aucklandmhs@gmail.com and confirmation of your
payment to the BNZ account of the AMHS: 02 0160 0237509 00.
 Deadlines and Cancellations: Please confirm your booking details by 12 noon on Mon 3rd July 2017. Cancellations with refund or credit of any payment made will be accepted by phone or
email as above until noon on Wednesday 5th July. We appreciate payments in advance, as our caterers are paid that way.
*Payment is not required if you are attending the presentations only.

Presenter, Ernest Willoughby

Neurologist, Department of Neurology, Auckland City Hospital (since 1979), and (Hon) Clinical Associate Professor, Auckland University School of Medicine.

Ernest was born in Auckland, graduated MBChB from the University of Otago in 1969, and gained his FRACP in 1976. His basic training in Neurology was in Auckland, followed by a Fellowship in Neurology / Immunology at Sloan-Kettering Institute / Memorial Hospital, New York City, USA, from 1976 to 1979.    A general neurologist with a particular interest in multiple sclerosis, he is director of the Auckland MS clinic and Chair of the NZ MS Treatment Assessment Committee.

Topic Summary: Bad Karma or Divine Retribution?   H L Mencken’s stroke

 Henry Louis Mencken (1880 to 1956), journalist, editor, philologist, literary critic and social commentator, was probably the most influential American writer in the first half of the 20th century.   He fell from favour in the 1930s because of his views on the depression, Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal and fascism in Germany.    In 1948 he was incapacitated by a stroke and was no longer able to read.   Observations made by his brother and friends allow correlation of the clinical impairment with the autopsy carried out at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Presenter, Martin Wallace

Martin was born in NZ in 1935 and educated at Eketahuna District High School, and Wairarapa College, Masterton.  He graduated BMedSci and MBChB at Otago.   He was admitted to the RACP in 1963 and to the RCP in 1965.

Martin was a registrar in renal medicine at the Hammersmith Hospital from 1965 to 1967 (next door to Wormwood Scrubs Prison), and returned to NZ in 1968 where he worked in Renal Medicine at Waikato Hospital until he retired in 2000.

 

Topic Summary: Pneumonic Plague in Manchuria in 1910

 

The history of the 1910 plague epidemic in Manchuria involves local factors, clinical history, what has been called the geo-politics, and an account of a medical conference, the first in China.

 

 

Meeting – August 3rd 2017

Meetings of the Society
Auckland Medical History Society

The Auckland Medical History Society will meet in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library at Auckland City Hospital on Thursday 3rd August 2017 

 

 

The evening will be as follows:

6.00pm: Drinks will be served in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library
6.30pm: Dinner will be served in the dining room
7.30pm: Guest presenter, John Collins
8.30pm: Guest presenter, Ross Blair

1. Founder’s Lecture : Dispassion or Compassion? Attitudes of surgeons and experience in early nineteenth century Britian – Presented by John Collins
2. The Enigma of Antonia Scarpa and the University of Padua – Presented by Ross Blair

DINNER BOOKINGS
Dinner Cost: members $32 (including table waters and juice), non-members or guests $40, students with ID $18.
No payment is required for attendance at lectures only. Wine vouchers are to be pre-purchased.

Members are to:

Indicate the number of vouchers required and include payment for them with your dinner payment. One voucher will cost $5 and will be redeemed for one glass of wine. A bottle (approx. five glasses) can be purchased for $20 (4 vouchers).
 Collect your pre-ordered wine vouchers with your name badge. There will be few vouchers available on the
night so your advanced purchase of them is recommended.

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION – Number attending, names and method of payment.
 Book by phone: Call 0274 305 326 with the names of attendees, method of payment and your phone number
 Book by mail: Post the names of attendees, your phone number and cheque made out to the Auckland Medical History Society Elizabeth Collins, P O Box 133190, Eastridge, Auckland 1146
 Book by email: Send the names of attendees to aucklandmhs@gmail.com and confirmation of your
payment to the BNZ account of the AMHS: 02 0160 0237509 00.
 Deadlines and Cancellations: Please confirm your booking details by 12 noon on Mon 3rd July 2017. Cancellations with refund or credit of any payment made will be accepted by phone or
email as above until noon on Wednesday 5th July. We appreciate payments in advance, as our caterers are paid that way.
*Payment is not required if you are attending the presentations only.

Presenter, John Collins 

After graduating with distinction in medicine in Ireland, John trained as a general surgeon in England. Soon after being appointed as a surgeon at Middlemore Hospital, he returned to the UK (Leeds) on a Commonwealth Foundation Scholarship. After completing his MCH, he joined the University of Auckland based at South Auckland Health, where his major focus was in breast surgery and medical education. He later completed an MD in medical education.

After a severe injury to his left hand ended his surgical career, he was appointed Foundation Dean of Education at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in Melbourne and later Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne – the latter position he still retains. Five years later he transferred to the University of Oxford as Visiting Professor and Fellow of Green Templeton College, both appointments he still occupies. John is a guide at the Auckland War Memorial Museum and is currently undertaking a PhD in the History of Medicine at the University of Auckland.

Topic Summary:

Attitudes of surgeons and experience of patients in early nineteenth century Britain 

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, caricaturists and others frequently labelled surgeons as callous, pitiless, and unfeeling, eager to operate and oblivious to the pain and suffering they inflicted on patients in the name of healing. Indeed, the emotional ability to inflict pain was said to be a prerequisite for those wishing to consider surgery as a career. This presentation will examine whether indeed these surgeons were bereft of compassion and also consider the personal experiences of patients undergoing surgery at that time.

Presenter, Ross Douglas Blair

Born in Hamilton, Ross attended Auckland Grammar School and then completed an MBChB in Otago 1965. As a house surgeon in Auckland 1966-1967 with a bias to surgery and particularly working in the Greenlane CTSU, Ross decided to continue with surgery. After a year as a graduate demonstrator in physiology at Otago to obtain the surgical primary, he returned to Auckland and obtained FRACS in 1970.

Ross’ special interest in vascular surgery was confirmed in 1971 working in the CTSU Greenlane as a senior registrar. David Cole arranged for him to continue vascular training in Colchester. Appointed a consultant in Thoracic and Vascular Surgery at Waikato hospital in 1973, Geoff Allen and Ross established a Vascular Surgery service for the Waikato region as well as providing a general Thoracic service. When Ross retired in 2012, the unit boasted five vascular surgeons. A separate Cardio-thoracic unit was established in 1989.

Ross became involved in the Australasian College of Surgeons when appointed a General Surgical examiner in 1987, and was appointed senior examiner in vascular surgery when this became a separate specialty in 1995.  His election as Chairman of the Court of Examiners, the first New Zealander to hold that position, was the final challenge. Elected a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons in 1993, Ross has served as Chairman of the Australasian Chapter, and Governor for Australia and NZ.

Ross joined the RNZAMC in 1977 as a territorial, and continued an involvement until 2015, with deployments to the Pacific Islands, the First Gulf War and East Timor. An interest in Medico-Legal matters was triggered by the RACS asking him to chair an inquiry into Cardio -Thoracic Surgery in Christchurch 1993 (Ramstead Inquiry), and as a result of this, he chaired the NZ Medico-Legal Reform Group. In his retirement he continues this interest as Chairman of Medicus Indemnity Insurance NZ.

The other activities which keep Ross out of trouble are yachting, music and singing with Auckland Choral. Medical History, and in particular collecting old medical texts, is a continuing interest.

Topic Summary: The Enigma of Antonia Scarpa and the University of Padua

Scarpa graduated from the University of Padua in 1770, and continued an illustrious career in Pavia, as an anatomist and surgeon, renowned throughout Europe and Britain.  With 10 anatomical eponyms, he made a major contribution to the anatomy of the ear, glossopharyngeal and cardiac nerves, nasopalatine nerve, anatomy and surgery of inguinal hernias, treatment of ocular diseases, anatomy of club foot, and nature of atherosclerosis. His book on Aneurysms (English edition 1808) is a masterful description of aneurysms, but he is very critical of the aetiology of aneurysms as taught by his contemporaries. Described as an authoritarian and picky man, with few friends and many enemies, it appears that his personality damaged his reputation and influence in Pavia and his alma mater, Padua.

Ross Blair hopes that the tribunal of history will recognise Scarpa’s valuable contribution to medicine.

Meeting – July 6th 2017

Meetings of the Society
Auckland Medical History Society

The Auckland Medical History Society will meet in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library at Auckland City Hospital on Thursday 6th July 2017 

 

 

The evening will be as follows:

6.00pm: Drinks will be served in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library
6.30pm: Dinner will be served in the dining room
7.30pm: Guest presenter, Patricia Clarkson
8.30pm: Guest presenter, Linda Bryder

1. Penicillin – However Did It Come to Reach the Patient? Presented by Patricia Clarkson
2. The Nursing Oral History Project Presented by Linda Bryder

DINNER BOOKINGS
Dinner Cost: members $32 (including table waters and juice), non-members or guests $40, students with ID $18.
No payment is required for attendance at lectures only. Wine vouchers are to be pre-purchased.

Members are to:

Indicate the number of vouchers required and include payment for them with your dinner payment. One voucher will cost $5 and will be redeemed for one glass of wine. A bottle (approx. five glasses) can be purchased for $20 (4 vouchers).
 Collect your pre-ordered wine vouchers with your name badge. There will be few vouchers available on the
night so your advanced purchase of them is recommended.

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION – Number attending, names and method of payment.
 Book by phone: Call 0274 305 326 with the names of attendees, method of payment and your phone number
 Book by mail: Post the names of attendees, your phone number and cheque made out to the Auckland Medical History Society Elizabeth Collins, P O Box 133190, Eastridge, Auckland 1146
 Book by email: Send the names of attendees to aucklandmhs@gmail.com and confirmation of your
payment to the BNZ account of the AMHS: 02 0160 0237509 00.
 Deadlines and Cancellations: Please confirm your booking details by 12 noon on Mon 3rd July 2017. Cancellations with refund or credit of any payment made will be accepted by phone or
email as above until noon on Wednesday 5th July. We appreciate payments in advance, as our caterers are paid that way.
*Payment is not required if you are attending the presentations only.

Patricia Clarkson

MBChB (UNZ 1957). Dip American Boards Pediatrics (1965) and Pediatric Cardiology (1966). MRACP (1969). FRACP(1974)

After graduation, Patricia had house surgeon and registrar appointments at Napier Hospital, followed by fellowships in paediatric and paediatric cardiology at the Mayo Clinic, USA.  On return to New Zealand, Patricia’s practice was largely confined to Paediatric Cardiology and Newborn Medicine with paediatric appointments at Green Lane and National Women’s Hospitals.  Her research interests included the natural history of congenital heart disease and the late outcomes of surgical treatment.

Patricia is a long-time member of the Auckland Medical History Society.

Topic Summary: Pencillin – However Did it Come to Reach the Patient?

From mould to medicine. Patricia will present a brief account of some of the events and people involved in the journey, including a comment on the first use in New Zealand.

 

Linda Bryder

Linda was born in Auckland, graduated MA (1st Class Hons) in History at the University of Auckland, and undertook her doctorate at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis on the history of tuberculosis was published by Oxford University Press. In 1988 she returned to New Zealand to take up a lectureship in the History Department of the University of Auckland, and has taught the history of medicine at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels ever since. She is currently Professor and Head of Department. She has published widely in the history of modern medicine, including histories of the Plunket Society and on National Women’s Hospital. She has held Visiting Fellowships in Glasgow and Oxford, and currently holds an honorary chair at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She is a Fellow of the New Zealand Academy of Humanities and of Royal Society of New Zealand.

Topic Summary:  The Nursing Oral History Project

 

“You worked hard, you played hard … and you growled and you laughed”: An oral history of nurses who trained in New Zealand in the 1950s and the 1960s

 

The subject of this talk is the nursing oral history project, which Linda was involved with along with Margaret Horsbrough, Kate Prebble and Debbie Dunsford, and which eventually led to the setting up of a website to showcase stories of New Zealand nurses (http://www.nursinghistory.org.nz). In this talk Linda will discuss some of the themes which emerged from the project, common experiences which reveal the nature of nurse training prior to its move into tertiary institutions. These include the reasons for entering the nursing profession, experiences on the wards, and the role of the nurses’ homes for these student nurses.

 

Meeting – March 2017

Meetings of the Society
Auckland Medical History Society

The Auckland Medical History Society will meet in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library at Auckland City Hospital on Thursday 2nd March 2017 

 

 

The evening will be as follows:

6.00pm: Drinks will be served in the Ernest and Marion Davis Library
6.30pm: Dinner will be served in the dining room
7.30pm: Annual General Meeting
7.50pm: Guest presenter, Richard Pusey (UK)
8.30pm: Guest presenter, Tessa Mazey-Richardson

1. The experiences of Nurses on board the NZ Hospital Ships during World War I
Presented by Tessa Mazey-Richardson
2. Medical History on the Doorstep Presented by Dr Richard Pusey

DINNER BOOKINGS
Dinner Cost: members $32 (including table waters and juice), non-members or guests $40, students with ID $18.
No payment is required for attendance at lectures only. Wine vouchers are to be pre-purchased.

Members are to:

Indicate the number of vouchers required and include payment for them with your dinner payment. One voucher will cost $5 and will be redeemed for one glass of wine. A bottle (approx. five glasses) can bepurchased for $20 (4 vouchers).
 Collect your pre-ordered wine vouchers with your name badge. There will be few vouchers available on the
night so your advanced purchase of them is recommended.

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION – Number attending, names and method of payment.
 Book by phone: Call 0274 305 326 with the names of attendees, method of payment and your phone number
 Book by mail: Post the names of attendees, your phone number and cheque made out to the Auckland
Medical History Society, to Prof J Collins, PO Box 125026, St Heliers, Auckland 1740
 Book by email: Send the names of attendees to aucklandmhs@gmail.com and confirmation of your
payment to the BNZ account of the AMHS: 02 0160 0237509 00.
 Deadlines and Cancellations: Please confirm your booking details by 12 noon on Mon 27February 2017. Cancellations with refund or credit of any payment made will be accepted by phone or
email as above until noon on Wednesday 1 March. We appreciate payments in advance, as our caterers are
paid that way.
*Payment is not required if you are attending the presentations only.

Tessa Mazey-Richardson
Tessa (21) is the first recipient of the Auckland Medical History Society Essay prize instituted in 2016, and is working towards an MA in History at the University of Auckland. Born in Cambridge (UK) and having been
raised in Oxford, Tessa emigrated to Christchurch in 2008. Her passion for history began after her primary school’s visit to the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford, where she was fascinated by the musical instruments, weapons, masks, textiles, jewellery and tools on display; and decidedly frightened by the shrunken heads.
Tessa pursued her enthusiasm for the past, taking History, Classics and Latin at secondary school, and then moving to Auckland to study History and Ancient History at the University of Auckland. Within the broad
discipline of History, Tessa’s key area of interest is social history, especially regarding women’s and gender history. Studying the history of medicine has enabled her to explore new aspects of these histories and
opened her eyes to another, fascinating and somewhat un-tapped area of study.

Topic Summary: ‘The Experiences of Nurses on Board the NZ Hospital Ships during WWI’
Tessa’s presentation is based on her final essay submitted for Linda Bryder’s postgraduate paper on the history of health, medicine and society. New Zealand nurses played a significant role in the First World
War, a role that has been somewhat under-represented in the relevant scholarship. Much work has been undertaken regarding the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF), especially concerning the events at
Gallipoli, but the contribution of the New Zealand Army Nursing Services (NZANS) has been comparatively overlooked. Analyses of first-hand descriptions of the changing conditions of nursing on board a New
Zealand hospital ship reveal more general attitudes towards, and expectations of, the First World War.
Lastly, it is also possible to assess the degree to which the Nightingale ethos was present in the experiences of these nurses.

Dr Richard Pusey
Richard Pusey was born in London in 1947 and trained in medicine at Birmingham University, qualifying MB ChB in 1970. He specialised in surgery, and was awarded the FRCS (England) in 1975. He then specialised in orthopaedic surgery and was appointed consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Basildon Hospital in Essex, where he worked until retirement in 2003. In his “retirement”, Dr Pusey became part-time senior lecturer in anatomy at UCL in London, has served on the Court of Examiners of the Royal College of Surgeons, is a volunteer at the Hunterian Museum and gives regular gallery talks and tours. He is past president of the History of Medicine section of the Royal Society of Medicine.
Topic Summary: ‘Medical History on the Doorstep’
Dr Pusey lives in a village called Ingatestone in Essex, which goes back to Saxon times, and will describe some of the medical people who have worked in the area. He will talk about Daniel Sutton, who refined
smallpox inoculation in the 1760s, the Chamberlen brothers, who invented obstetric forceps in the 17th century, and Clopton Havers, who was one of the early microscopists and described Haversian Canals in bone.
William Harvey, who described the circulation, is buried locally, as is is King Harold, who lost to William 1st at the battle of Hastings, and Dr Pusey will suggest that he was not shot in the eye after all!